Should Mom Bloggers Discuss Their Income and What is the Industry Standard?

If I hear it one more time, I’m gonna scream.

IF YOU DON’T KNOW HOW MUCH BLOGGERS ARE MAKING, HOW CAN YOU SET AN INDUSTRY STANDARD FOR THE REST OF US?

I “get” this statement, but it also annoys the heck out of me because there IS NOT an industry standard for blogging. We simply possess too many strengths and weakness in the social media realm for black and white numbers.

For example, Blogger A may have few blog subscribers and traffic, but is extremely active and engaging on Twitter.  Blogger B may bring in thousands of blog comments a month, but doesn’t hang out on Facebook much. Blogger C may be strong in all areas, but only fits a specific niche. The list of variables is endless, which is why it’s impossible to define an industry standard.  Instead, fees are based on a blogger’s strengths, level of work, and (to be frank) what a business is willing to pay.

Compensation can also take many forms.  Trade can be just as valuable as cash.  A tweet from a blogger with 50,000 Twitter followers in return for a blog post may be a fair transaction for some.  A valuable product in exchange for advertising space may be another.  Dollars are nice, but serious bloggers know that money isn’t the only way to grow and expand.  So again, how can one measure this?  You can’t.

DID YOU HEAR THAT BLOGGER X MAKES $8000 A TWITTER PARTY AND CHARGES $500 A POST?  I WISH I COULD CHARGE THAT!

A. Don’t believe everything you hear.  

B. If she is making $8000 a Twitter party and $500 a post, that is actually good for all of us.  If she can do it, we can to. Kudos to her for doing so.

C. Mind your own business and refer back to A.

HOW DO YOU KNOW WHERE TO START?

When you’re ready to start charging fees, confide in a blogger you can trust for advice, test the waters, or do a little bit of both.  As your blog grows, you can gradually raise that number and always, always, always remember that cash isn’t always the best deal maker or breaker.  Use your gut.  Some of the best business relationships come from working for free.

In time, you will get into a groove and know exactly what fees you are comfortable charging for.  It will become second nature to you.  If you overhear what another blogger is making, don’t compare yourself to her.  Charge what you believe to be fair to you and the client.  Worrying less about what other bloggers are doing gives you more time to build a career. Take this to heart.

FINAL THOUGHTS?

You may not be ready to charge a fee for your work.  That’s okay.  Keep working, networking and building content.  Your time will come.

Be okay with failure.  In fact, count on it happening. You will be turned down more than accepted.  You will also be criticized for your mistakes and shortcomings. This isn’t a bad thing. Use it as a chance to learn and improve your work. THIS is what will make your work stand out. Improve yourself with each fail and you will rise above those who cannot.  Most cannot.  Remember that.

Have questions?  Comment away.